Saturday, 9 February 2013

The Pallet shed build



One of the first things I decided to do was to build myself a new shed as from what I've been told the guy before me had the plot for 40 years and the old shed has been there for 30+ years. It's full of asbestos and thick rubber sheets and has no windows, its also pretty small and being 6ft and a smidge I have to bend down to get in and can barely turn round. I think 40 years ago everyone must have been tiny. 




 The horrid old shed.












So it was decided a new shed was a must it had to be comfortable, fit for purpose, big enough to fit at least two people in it and have some windows; that was pretty much the brief I started with so here goes.

First job was to get hold of loads of pallets luckily there building a lot of new houses next to our site and the builders were happy to supply.

My Dad did manage to get me some big heavy duty pallets for the base which were identical. I leveled off on old bricks and stone which were lying around.


We put a a tarpaulin down and set to work as the pallets are all the same size they fit together easily and the results are pretty quick they virtually stand up on there own and are really sturdy much better than a matchbox shed from B&Q.
Our first roof goes on and things are looking good.



Matthew trying to look busy. Stripping down the pallets for the cladding was by far and away the hardest job but I think the end result was more than worth it. Once we got the glazing in that made a big difference  -  a bargain on eBay three sheets of double glazing for a whopping £1.


As you can see things soon had to be revised as I had a complaint from the committee that the shed was too big and that it looked like a chicken shed, strange as everyone who I had spoken to had said what a good idea it was recycling the pallets and it looked great. I agreed to scale it down and asked that they gave me the benefit of the doubt and to judge it when it was finished.





Yet again plans were changed, Lydia & Matthew didn't agree that a pitched roof was a good idea so seen as I run a democracy we opted for a flat roof. I must admit I am glad I did, there's a good pitch on it still and it'll be easier to build & maintain






Rather than clad the inside floor to ceiling I decided to utilize the spaces left by the pallets by turning them into shelving and putting window sills in to make it a bit more homely looking.
With a few leftovers we knocked up a bit of a veranda around the edge which we've all enjoyed having our sandwiches on. The roof was straight forward, just some chipboard sheets which my dad got from work which they use to separate the pallet loads and roofing felt.
And this is were I'm at now. It's moved on a lot, but as ever there's still loads to do. The door for one, but that should be going on pretty soon as I've managed to get hold of an old fire door on eBay for £1.70. I've just to cut it down and fit.




Thanks for looking i hope it's been interesting if you've any questions please feel free to comment.

Regards Chris.


3 comments:

  1. I think it came out looking fantastic so far! Good luck and god bless, can't wait to see the finished product!

    -Keystone Contracting Corp.
    Brooklyn Roofing Contractor

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  2. Looks great! I have just got an allotment and don't really know what I am doing so your blog was a great find! I love the idea of making my own shed instead of just putting a ready made one together. Will get collecting pallets! Do you have an idea of how many you used in the end? I will be opting for a smaller one too as we also have restrictions on site!

    Cheers :)

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  3. Pallets are great for fencing too as they can just slip over any existing uprights. Also mage great raised beds. Great shed!!

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